Archive for the 'Linux' Category

Amilo Pro v2030

Alright I finally got Debian installed on the Amilo Pro 2030 laptop. There were a few problems that I managed to solve, like an invisible mouse pointer/cursor and the wireless. So I’d like to share the solutions here:

    Invisible pointer:

edit /etc/X11/xorg.conf
add

Section “Device”
Identifier “Configured Video Device”
Option “HWCursor” “off”
Option “SWCursor” “on”

EndSection

    Wireless(with internet access available, e.g. ethernet):

Add the contrib repositories to /etc/apt/sources.list
e.g. deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian/ lenny main contrib

apt-get update
apt-get install b43-fwcutter

Download and setup the firmware when prompted.

Voila. Now get something to manage your connections according to your windows manager, I use wicd with LXDE.

Conky configuration for XFCE4+Compiz

Lately I’ve been very interested in monitoring my system, mainly temperatures. When I use Windows I like to monitor temperatures with realtemp and to monitor my linux temps I use lm_sensors.

Constantly typing in “sensors” in terminal to view the cpu temperature got me a bit annoyed. So I installed Conky, a fancy configurable monitoring program that sits on your desktop and displays system information. However, even though Conky was easy to install and configure to display what I needed, making it work properly in the XFCE4, Compiz and Avant Window Navigator scenario turned out to be very difficult.

When I looked for solutions I found many, but none of them worked with my setup. The problem was that with any ‘default’ .conkyrc from the Conky website, Conky would dissapear when I opened any window and minimized it. I tried some own_window variables but there was always a new problem when the old one was fixed. Finally I though I had found a working config, but no, Conky would flash from beneath windows every now and then, making, for example, Firefox browsing very irritating. Finally I figured out the culprit, it was own_window_type. The workaround was to completely forget own_window_type and only use and arsenal of own_window_hints. Here’s what worked for me and I have a feeling that it could work for others having the same problem:

double_buffer yes
own_window yes
own_window_transparent yes
own_window_hints undecorated,sticky,below,skip_taskbar,skip_pager

See there’s no own_window_type. Amazing when all the possible solutions that I ran into had something to do with own_window_type, e.g. own_window_type desktop or own_window_type override. Now Conky works fine and I can move to calibrating the sensors output. Please comment if this helped, or if you need help 😀

Bye Bye Debian, Hello Arch Linux

Debian has always been there for me. There were times when I tried out Ubuntu, but to me thats Debian with a lot of stuff I don’t need. Anyway I tried out Arch linux and fell in love. First of all it’s very different from Debian… well instead of apt you get pacman 😀 Anyhow it’s easy to install, easy to customize to the needs of your computer, very fast and last but not least the online documentation is very good. Using Arch has also taught me a lot that Debian didn’t. My servers will probably be running Debian, but otherswise I think Arch’s here to stay… sorry Deb.

Why Use SSH?

This is a short practical introduction to SSH and how you can benefit from using it, or atleast how I have. The secure shell (SSH) network protocol is often unknown to new linux users, and probably to 99% of all only-Windows users 😀 SSH is used for remote connections over a network, both computers could be in the same LAN, or you could connect to an external ip from the outside world.

I remember when my friend helped me configure something in Debian with SSH from his home. At that point I didn’t actually see how I could personally benefit from it other than being helped to fix things. Later I got more interested in server stuff, but after giving my second monitor away to the same friend who helped my with the config, I started working with SSH to avoid switching one monitor between 2 computers.

These days I try to install the OpenSSH server on my server-box asap, so that I can have the monitor for the pc that actually has a graphical interface 😀 With Debian/Ubuntu you can find the openssh-server packet on the install cd and in the repositories, if it’s not installed already. You also need a client for the system that you are connecting from, openssh-client for Debian/Ubuntu, and I use Putty for Windows. You can apt-get the Debian packages.

SSH is easy to set up. For example with a fresh install of a distribution, I try to get the openssh-server up and running asap after I get my net setup. This helps me troubleshoot and follow install instructions on my other computer while working on the monitorless computer. I can’t solve everything without a proper browser! Another scenario is if xorg doesn’t work anymore so you can’t really look for help in e.g. google, but luckily you’ve got the openssh-server running and: 1.) another working computer at home 2.) your friend who will let you use his computer for a few minutes. One way or another you can find help much easyer, and continue messing around sooner 😛 Right now I’ve got this pc, with my TinyXp Beast edition, connected to my Debian server with SSH. Both computers are sitting next to each other but I’ve only got one monitor, convenient. As you can see SSH can make your life easyer.

Hopefully this gets the basic idea of SSH through, and opens new doors to linux users. You can find more on how to setup SSH on your distribution by googling around now that you definately want to start using it 😀